• All Topics

Form and guidance for researchers who want help to find PPI contributors

Uploaded: 2nd December 2019 | Topic: About service user involvement in research

Resource was added by: Bec Hanley

Members of the Charities Research Involvement Group are often approached by researchers who want to find PPI contributors to actively involve in their work. Many of us ask researchers to complete an application form to help us to decide whether to share this request with our networks, and if so what information to share.
We've produced this guidance to help all members to produce or improve such a form.

Current affairs – shared by Laura Elliot, Pancreatic Cancer UK

Uploaded: 30th January 2019 | Topic: Introductions exercises

Resource was added by: Bec Hanley

Local elections are coming up next week! Imagine you are standing for election – for our introduction exercise today, I’d like you to think of two pledges you would include in your manifesto to win over the voters. One of your ideas should be practical and deliverable, but the other can be completely blue-sky, dream-world, no-constraints fabulous. Discuss on your tables, and then we’ll share some of your manifesto ideas with the group.

Collage exercise – shared by Bethany Bateman, British Lung Foundation

Uploaded: 11th January 2019 | Topic: Introductions exercises

Resource was added by: Bec Hanley

This can be a great ice-breaker but doubles up as a way of getting people to think differently about a topic.

You will need:
• Flip chart paper
• Magazines, newspapers and health information/literature about your charity (the latter two are useful as they will have topical words and images that may be relevant)
• Glue sticks

Before people arrive, pick one or two topics and write them on flip chart paper
• This could just be “me”, “my condition” or “health” if all you want is an ice-breaker
• You could also pick a topic that you’ll cover later in the day, eg. “prevention”, “diagnosis”, “hospital care”, etc

As people arrive, ask them to start ripping images, sentences, headlines, etc out of the newspapers and magazines, that they think are relevant to the topics on the flipchart paper.

Ask them to glue the things they’ve cut out to the relevant topic.

About 10 minutes before the end of your allotted time, ask the delegates to look at the collages with you and start to share why they made those choices

If I have chosen a topic that we’ll cover later in the day, save discussion of that collage until you’re ready to start on that topic. I ask people to volunteer their comments but also ask:
• Is there anything on the collage, that they didn’t put up there, that they like?
• What does that mean to them?
• Is it the same thing that the person who put it on there was thinking?

By thinking about other people ideas and discussing what may be a different meaning behind those images / sentences, it gets people thinking more creatively and more about the “big picture”.

The Three H’s – shared by Claire Britton, CRUK

Uploaded: 11th January 2019 | Topic: Introductions exercises

Resource was added by: Bec Hanley

Purpose of the activity:
A quick and interesting ice-breaker activity to enable a group of people to share top-line information about a recent highlight, challenge and something they’re looking forward to.

How to run this activity:
- Ask everyone to get into pairs.
- Each person to share a recent Highlight, Headache and what’s on the Horizon (hence the 3 H’s) with their partner
- After 5 minutes stop the conversation and bring everyone back together. Depending on how much time you have, ask people to volunteer to share their 3 H’s.

Positive risk-taking: from rhetoric to reality

Uploaded: 17th April 2018 | Topic: Guidelines and good practice

Resource was added by: Natalie Swiderska

A discussion paper from Steve Morgan and Nick Andrews for the The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice.

Purpose – For health and social care services to become truly person-centred requires a fundamentally positive mindset from professionals and care workers, and a willingness to take some risks. The purpose of this paper is to explore how this will apply to delivering dementia services, where almost all of the initial impressions are of deficits, disability and disadvantage.